Cognitive Disorder

Cognitive disorders (CDs), also known as neurocognitive disorders (NCDs), are a category of mental health disorders that primarily affect cognitive abilities including learning, memory, perception, and problem solving.  Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—and behavioral abilities to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. These functions include memory, language skills, visual perception, problem solving, self-management, and the ability to focus and pay attention. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person’s functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.

Cognitive disorders are a category of mental health disorders that primarily affect learning, memory, perception, and problem solving, and include amnesia, dementia, and delirium. The four major categories of cognitive disorders are: delirium (a change in consciousness that develops over a short period of time in which people have a reduced awareness of their environment); dementia (a progressive deterioration of brain function that is marked by impairment of memory, confusion and inability to concentrate; amnesia (a significant loss of the memory, despite no loss of other cognitive functions like there is in dementia; and cognitive disorders not otherwise specified (cognitive impairment presumed to be due to a general medical condition or substance use and does not fit into the other categories).

Cognitive disorders are defined as any disorder that significantly impairs the cognitive function of an individual to the point where normal functioning in society is impossible without treatment. Some common cognitive disorders include Dementia, Developmental disorders, Motor skill disorders, Amnesia, Substance-induced cognitive impairment.

Related Journals of Cognitive disorders

International Journal of Mental Health & Psychiatry, International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology, Child and Adolescent Behaviour, Brain Disorders & Therapy, Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies, Journal of Cognitive Psychology, Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly, Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive – Behavior Therapy, Language and Cognitive Processes, Advances in Cognitive Psychology

Raising a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and caring for a parent with end-stage Alzheimer’s disease are obviously very different experiences. But for the caregiver, there’s a lot of common ground, too.

The fact is, taking care of someone who suffers from cognitive problems — rather than physical ones — requires different expectations and a special set of caregiving skills. So whether it’s autismDown syndromedementia, or a brain injury, what makes caring for a person with cognitive problems distinct? And as a caregiver, what do you need to know? Here are some answers.

Cognitive Problems: Appearance and Reality

Seeing a family member become sick and physically disabled is terribly difficult. But being with a loved one who is in good physical health but has serious cognitive problems is devastating in its own particular way.

When your mom with Alzheimer’s disease sits across from you at the table, she might look perfectly normal – the same as she always did. But she isn’t the same anymore. The gulf between the appearance and the reality can be difficult to handle, and it’s something that caregivers are faced with daily.

It can also be difficult to get sympathy or understanding from friends or family members for what you’re going through as a caregiver. There may be no outward sign of your loved one’s illness — no wheelchair or crutches or oxygen tank to help them understand. After talking to him for a few minutes, your neighbors might think your dad with dementia seems as sharp and funny as ever. Your friends may say that your son with autism or daughter with Down syndrome seems like any other kid.

You know differently. You know the backbreaking effort that goes into caregiving, and you know the pain of having a loved one suffering from a cognitive problem. Not getting that recognition and validation can make caregiving especially difficult and lonely.